Metal Finishing Guide Book

2013

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Table II. Approximate Weight Table for Spiral Sewed Pieced Buffs REGULAR Approx. 3/4 in. Thick Diameter (in.) 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 HEAVY Approx. 5/16 in. Thick EXTRA HEAVY Approx. 3/8 in. Thick Lbs. Per 100 Sections Sections Per 100 Lbs. Lbs. Per 100 Sections Sections Per 100 Lbs. Lbs. Per 100 Sections Sections Per 100 Lbs. 7.4 11.5 16.6 22.1 29.4 36.5 46.0 55.6 66.3 77.7 90.2 103.5 117.7 132.9 149.0 166.1 184.0 202.9 222.6 243.4 265.2 1351 870 602 452 340 274 217 180 151 129 111 97 85 76 67 60 54 49 45 41 38 8.2 12.8 18.4 25.0 32.7 41.3 51.0 61.7 73.5 86.2 100.0 114.8 130.6 147.4 165.3 184.2 204.1 225.0 246.9 269.9 294.1 1220 781 543 400 306 242 196 162 136 116 100 87 77 68 60 51 49 44 40 37 34 11.1 17.3 24.9 33.0 44.1 54.8 69.0 83.4 99.5 116.6 135.3 155.3 176.6 199.4 223.5 249.0 276.0 304.4 333.9 365.1 397.8 900 578 401 303 227 182 145 119 100 86 74 64 57 50 45 40 36 33 29 27 25 VENTILATED BIAS BUFFS Although the puckered characteristic of bias buffs results in cooler running, some operating conditions require additional cooling. Steel centers with holes and ridges are designed to collect and divert more air. The air cools the buff and the workpiece surface. Clinch rings permit use of reusable metal inserts for substantial savings (Fig. 5). PUCKERED BUFFS Puckered buffs are rated by numbers. Higher numbers indicate greater cloth content, buff density, and face convolutions (Fig. 6). Higher densities and closer convolutions increase cutting and reduce streaking. Open-Face Cloth Buffs The open-face buff prevents loading, packing, clogging, and ridging during finishing operations. The plies are configured differently from the closedface design. Buff material is wound singly or in groups of two, three, four, or more plies. Open-face buffs may be "straight wound" or "spiral wound" for a corkscrew or cross-cutting action that further minimizes streaking. Buff density varies with the number of plies, the amount of cloth, thread count, fabric weight, and treatment of the cloth. Buff pressure, speed, angle to the part, cloth strength, compound absorption ability, ventilation, and cloth flexibility are varied with buff design. 41

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